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Category Archives: Public Safety Experts

Author Be The Cop

 

Police Body Cameras

 

Author Be The Cop:
Scenario

You’re an officer issued a new body camera. Your spouse, partner, mate, etc says, “WOW, that’s exciting, lets use it to record during our lovemaking.”

Would would you do?

 
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Posted by on August 3, 2015 in Public Safety Experts

 

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Author be the Cop

WWYD:

You’re the officer making a lawful arrest. You inform violator they are under arrest. They decide to resist your commands.
What Would You Do?

Author be the Cop

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2015 in Public Safety Experts

 

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Writers – What’s the BUZZ?

We’ve created this website first and foremost because of our love for authors—we want you to get it right the first time, and we want to make it easy for you.

SilverHart is a unique combination that stems from two vastly different careers—encompassing both publishing and law enforcement so authors can write it right.

Writers – What’s the BUZZ?

 

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Today, Tomorrow, or Next Year? Coping with PTSD in EMS

By Allison G. S. Knox, M.A., EMT-B, faculty member at American Military University

Most of the time, emergency medical technicians (EMTs) and paramedics respond to non-urgent emergencies but there are also “rough” calls that are traumatic and disturbing. In recognition of National EMS Week and National Mental Health Month, EMTs must take a moment to realize that such traumatic calls may not bother them today, tomorrow, or next week. However, such calls have a way of seeping into the crevices of one’s subconscious and impacting a person months or even years down the road. Incidents can impact EMTs differently and for different reasons. Some EMTs are affected because of the mechanism of the injury, for a personal reason (i.e. EMTs who are parents responding to an injured child), or by calls that didn’t go as expected.

The Reality of PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a serious psychological issue that can affect people who work in public safety communities. Whether a person is a service member, police officer, firefighter, or EMT—many suffer from PTSD.

I have often heard individuals say they think someone is suffering from PTSD shortly after an event. What we know about PTSD is that it often isn’t that fast-acting and there is no quick fix when it comes to treating someone suffering with it.

The Mayo Clinic explains: “PTSD is a mental health condition that’s triggered by a terrifying event—either experiencing it or witnessing it…Many people who go through traumatic events have difficulty adjusting and coping for a while, but they don’t have PTSD.” However, if a person’s symptoms worsen or last six months to a year, then they very well may have PTSD and should seek professional support.

PTSD typically strikes several months after an event and has terrible repercussions like sleep problems, anxiety, rage, and many other physical manifestations. Suffering from PTSD can be quite frightening and it often feels like psychological torture. Unfortunately, many individuals are too embarrassed to discuss it with anyone—even close friends and family.

[Related article: Silent Suffering: Warning Signs and Steps to Prevent Suicide]

If you suspect someone is suffering from PTSD, let him or her know that you care. Help the person to find a professional therapist, one who is trained specifically in combat-related PTSD and anxiety disorders. There are many great practitioners in the mental health field with many resources to address PTSD. Sometimes, those suffering just need a guiding light to a professional. Friends and family can be that light, but must be supportive and positive without including any judgment when talking to the person who is suffering.

[Related article: Critical Incident Stress Management Interventions Help Heal First Responders]

Public safety professionals must realize that they are only human and there will be scenes and calls that are too graphic to forget and may have a deep impact on them. Instead of allowing these situations to haunt one’s psyche and impact one’s life, seek support from a mental health professional—it is a sign of strength to ask for help.

 

Today, Tomorrow, or Next Year? Coping with PTSD in EMS

 

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Stuck – What are your tips for moving past writer’s block?

Stuck – What are your tips for moving past writer’s block?

 

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Author be the Cop – WWYD

 

Author be the Cop – WWYD
Q: If you were Chief of Police, what would you do to stop / prevent crime?

What would you do?

 

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Fit@50 / week 17

2015-07-09 13.22.54

Fit@50 / week 17
The more things change:

The last time I was in NYC was the early 1990’s working a wiretap for the DEA. My partner and I came up to join with the NYPD & DEA’s New York field office to track down criminals operating across country.

WOW, that was a long time ago, but coming back this week also included lots of concentration on crime and dastardly villains.

I’m presenting and attending International Thriller Writers Organization‘s ThrillerFest while on vacation. Everyone from Lee Child to Steve Berry to John Gilstrap to Liliana Hart (you had to guess that one), plus many more.

My hotel is a lot nicer than the shanties we were stuck in during surveillances and sting operations in the 90’s. Our food is sit down and eat, instead of grab it and go. And instead of a submachine gun strapped around my neck, I have a conference layard.

What I thought would be true, still very much is–I’d prefer the company of those men and women in blue who’d sacrificed so much if only to make the world a little safer for a brief moment in time.

I enjoy the embrace of writers who so meticulously craft stories about those same cops I’ve served with over the past 25 years. But if I had my choice, I’d be back behind the binoculars with a submachine around my neck waiting to snatch the next bad guy who surfaced from his hole.

It’s important to never, ever forget where you come from. Even if it meant long days and sleepless nights to get somewhere else.

Do good,
Scott

 

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