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Author Be The Cop

 

Police Body Cameras

 

Author Be The Cop:
Scenario

You’re an officer issued a new body camera. Your spouse, partner, mate, etc says, “WOW, that’s exciting, lets use it to record during our lovemaking.”

Would would you do?

 
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Posted by on August 3, 2015 in Public Safety Experts

 

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Author be the Cop

WWYD:

You’re the officer making a lawful arrest. You inform violator they are under arrest. They decide to resist your commands.
What Would You Do?

Author be the Cop

 
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Posted by on July 27, 2015 in Public Safety Experts

 

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FIT@50 \ week 19

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FIT@50 \ week 19

Sidelined

Growing up playing every sport imaginable, the idea of being sidelined was inconceivable. As I’ve grown more “fit”, the idea of shining light on others while supporting from the bench is amazing.

I considered what a difference a week makes. We were in NYC for a thriller writers’ conference dominated by a different crowd – okay, it’s still very much a boys club.

Liliana Hart​ stood aside as authors introduced themselves to discuss crime and mystery writing and my career in law enforcement. It was different to have writers not recognize her, but she genuinely encouraged me to go off and talk “shop.”

This week, the table’s been turned as NYC has been taken over by romance writers during the Romance Writers of America​ conference. I must confess that I enjoy cheering from the sidelines while my wife shines.

Giving praise and support to others is a blessing for all.
Do good,
Scott

 
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Posted by on July 24, 2015 in Scott & Liliana

 

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Writers – What’s the BUZZ?

We’ve created this website first and foremost because of our love for authors—we want you to get it right the first time, and we want to make it easy for you.

SilverHart is a unique combination that stems from two vastly different careers—encompassing both publishing and law enforcement so authors can write it right.

Writers – What’s the BUZZ?

 

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This Is What Editors Know About Publishing That Writers Don’t

Good editors really can add value, in two ways.

First, editors are industry professionals who can educate often-naive authors about the facts of life in the real world of publishing. (Agents are great at this too, often even better.) The other answers have some excellent details on this, but I think it boils down to: Just because you want to write it doesn’t mean somebody else wants to read it, and certainly not that he or she wants to pay for it.

Second, and even more important, editors can view writers and their products from the outside, which authors themselves rarely can. Think of Burns’ “wad some Pow’r the giftie gie us, to see oursels as ithers see us”–that’s the power editors have and writers usually don’t.

Sometimes, that means being able to see the positive things an author or a manuscript has to offer, even if it’s not very clear. For example, I’ve gone to writers and solicited pieces that the writers themselves didn’t think they could do or didn’t think would be worthwhile if they did, and sometimes managed to midwife the birth of great work, just by editorial vision and support. And sometimes writers don’t know the value of real gems of argument or information in their manuscripts, things that should be highlighted and brought to the fore, because they’re so used to knowing or thinking about them that they don’t recognize how interesting or important they’ll seem to others.

A lot of times, though, it means being able to see the chaff as well as the wheat, the haystack as well as the needle, and finding a way to tell authors infatuated with the sound of their own voices or opinions that the piece would be better if pruned back, rearranged, rewritten, etc. Or, unfortunately, sometimes just dropped entirely, with the writer moving on to a more promising project.

Bottom line, editors serve as proxies for readers at large–proxies who, if they are doing their job properly, not only understand what those readers need and appreciate, but are able to help writers do what is necessary to reach them. Readers are outer-directed, writers are often inner-directed, editors try to bridge the gap between the two so their interactions can be more mutually rewarding. (Spoiler alert: that usually means asking why anybody other than the writer should care about something, cutting verbiage, tightening language, getting to the point, all the usual stuff.)

This Is What Editors Know About Publishing That Writers Don’t

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Romance Writers of America’s 35th Annual Conference – Come along

We’re heading back to New York for this year’s Romance Writers of America’s 35th annual conference.We’re excited to see so many of our friends and the chances to meet so many others.

We’ll keep you updated and try to not get so caught up in the excitement that we forget to tweet from hash tag  #RWA15 – but no promises. It gets super exciting!

Will we see you there – let’s catch up.

There’s even a guide to surviving RWA – Check it out

 

Romance Writers of America’s 35th Annual Conference – Come along

 

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Lies, Denial & Buried Secrets—How to Create Dimensional Characters

True Detective.There is a line that’s repeated in the series and it is SO perfect for our purposes today.

Sometimes your worst self is your best self.

It’s tempting for us to create “perfect” protagonists and “pure evil” antagonists, but that’s the stuff of cartoons, not great fiction. Every strength has an array of corresponding weaknesses, and when we understand these soft spots, generating conflict becomes easier. Understanding character arc becomes simpler. Plotting will fall into place with far less effort.

All stories are character-driven. Plot merely serves to change characters from a lowly protagonist into a hero….kicking and screaming along the way. Plot provides the crucible. 

Plot is the push that drives the change. Without the plot problem, the protagonist is never forced to face weakness and can comfortably remain unchanged. Plot forces the protagonist to face the worst self in order to eventually unveil the best self.

One element that is critical to understand is this:

Everyone has Secrets

To quote Dr. Gregory House, Everybody lies.

All good stories hinge on secrets.

I have bodies under my porch.

Okay, not all secrets in our fiction need to be THIS huge.

Secret #1—“Real” Self Versus “Authentic” Self

We all have a face we show to the world, what we want others to see. If this weren’t true then my author picture would have me wearing a Batman T-shirt, yoga pants and a scrunchee, not a beautifully lighted photograph taken by a pro.

We all have faces we show to certain people, roles we play. We are one person in the workplace, another with family, another with friends and another with strangers. This isn’t us being deceptive in a bad way, it’s self-protection and it’s us upholding societal norms. This is why when Grandma starts discussing her bathroom routine, we cringe and yell, “Grandma! TMI! STOP!”

No one wants to be trapped in a long line at a grocery store with the total stranger telling us about her nasty divorce. Yet, if we had a sibling who was suffering, we’d be wounded if she didn’t tell us her marriage was falling apart.

Yet, people keep secrets. Some more than others. Most of us have secrets we keep even from ourselves 😉 .

In fact, if we look at The Joy Luck Club the entire book hinges on the fact that the mothers are trying to break the curses of the past by merely changing geography. Yet, as their daughters grow into women, they see the faces of the same demons wreaking havoc in their daughters’ lives…even though they are thousands of miles away from the past (China).

The mothers have to reveal their sins, but this will cost them the “perfect version of themselves” they’ve sold the world and their daughters (and frankly, themselves).

The daughters look at their mothers as being different from them. Their mothers are perfect, put-together, and guiltless. It’s this misperception that keeps a wall between them. This wall can only come down if the external facades (the secrets) are exposed.

Secret #2—False Face

Characters who seem strong, can, in fact, be scared half to death. Characters who seem to be so caring, can in fact be acting out of guilt, not genuine concern for others. We all have those fatal weaknesses, and most of us don’t volunteer these blemishes to the world.

In fact, we might not even be aware of them. It’s why shrinks are plentiful and paid well.

The woman whose house looks perfect can be hiding a month’s worth of laundry behind the Martha Stewart shower curtains. Go to her house and watch her squirm if you want to hang your coat in her front closet. She wants others to think she has her act together, but if anyone opens that coat closet door, the pile of junk will fall out…and her skeletons will be on public display.

Anyone walking toward her closets or asking to take a shower makes her uncomfortable because this threatens her false face.

Watch any episode of House and most of the team’s investigations are hindered because patients don’t want to reveal they are not ill and really want attention, or use drugs, are bulimic, had an affair, are growing marijuana in their attics, etc.

Secret #3—False Guilt

Characters can be driven to right a wrong they aren’t even responsible for. In Winter’s Bone Ree Dolly is driven to find her father before the bail bondsman takes the family land and renders all of them homeless.

Ree is old enough to join the Army and walk away from the nightmare, but she doesn’t. She feels a need to take care of the family and right a wrong she didn’t commit. She has to dig in and dismantle the family secrets (the crime ring entrenched in her bloodline) to uncover the real secret—What happened to her father?

She has to keep the family secret (otherwise she could just go to the cops) to uncover the greater, and more important secret. She keeps the secret partly out of self-preservation, but also out of guilt and shame.

CLICK HERE for the rest of the story:

Lies, Denial & Buried Secrets—How to Create Dimensional Characters

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